Tag: debt

Higher Interest Rates & Growth

Higher Interest Rates & Growth

It appears we were correct several weeks ago when we wrote that the Fed will maintain elevated interest rates for longer than markets expect. What are the repercussions for business? A persistently higher interest rate environment will expose hidden zombie companies much like the dry Paluxy River bed in Texas recently exposed dinosaur tracks. However, … Continue reading Higher Interest Rates & Growth

A Recession Won’t Cure Inflation Anytime Soon

A Recession Won’t Cure Inflation Anytime Soon

It sure feels as though we are in a recession: Weak reports from retailers such as Amazon (AMZN) and Target (TGT, twice in Target's case).Soft retail numbers HERE.Low consumer confidence HERE.Atlanta Fed's new GDPNow estimate (as of June 15th), is zero percent Real GDP for Q2.Depleted personal savings (chart below).Even Johnny Come Latelys like Guggenheim's … Continue reading A Recession Won’t Cure Inflation Anytime Soon

Consumer Strength Is Waning

Consumer Strength Is Waning

The New York Fed released its quarterly report on Household Debt and Credit this past week. Consumer strength is waning, not gaining. Loan delinquencies and foreclosures are up across auto loans and mortgage debt which is primarily where debt expansion has occurred in prior months. There are a number of charts between pages 3-40 that … Continue reading Consumer Strength Is Waning

What Will The “New Normal” Look Like?

What Will The “New Normal” Look Like?

Over the past several months we have written that the new economic normal means a target CPI in the 3-4% range and muted Real GDP in the 0-2% range. Interest rates can't go back to the Volcker days as Treasury would not be able to refinance its debt at double-digit rates. We could however see … Continue reading What Will The “New Normal” Look Like?

CPI Will Persist Above The Fed’s Target

CPI Will Persist Above The Fed’s Target

Inflation as measured by the CPI will persist above the Fed's target rate of 2% over the long-term. Why? Because as Milton Friedman said: "Inflation is always and everywhere a monetary phenomenon in the sense that it is and can be produced only by a more rapid increase in the quantity of money than in … Continue reading CPI Will Persist Above The Fed’s Target

The U.S. Economy Is Long-Term Fragile

The U.S. Economy Is Long-Term Fragile

We do not believe that investors fully appreciate how fragile the U.S. economy is. Our view is that the U.S. economy is in a recession and that this period will be followed by long-term muted growth given: 1.) the enormous U.S. Government debt load ($30.4 trillion), 2.) persistent price inflation, 3.) a consumption-driven economy rather … Continue reading The U.S. Economy Is Long-Term Fragile

Tough To Be A Fixed Income Investor

Tough To Be A Fixed Income Investor

It is tough to be a fixed income investor in this market. Yields are rising, but in real terms even high yield securities are in negative territory given the inflated CPI environment. Some fixed income portfolio managers are spinning that now is a great time to be a fixed income investor because high yield securities … Continue reading Tough To Be A Fixed Income Investor

The Fed Will Reset Its 2% Inflation Target

The Fed Will Reset Its 2% Inflation Target

Our view is that the Fed will reset its 2% inflation target approximately one year from now if it wants to salvage the last vestiges of its credibility. While April's CPI number may come down some due to the retreat in the price of oil, we could continue to see core inflation march higher for … Continue reading The Fed Will Reset Its 2% Inflation Target

Treasury Yields Will Only Move In One Direction

Treasury Yields Will Only Move In One Direction

10-year Treasury yields sit around 2.72% and will climb higher as the Fed: a.) lifts the Fed Funds Rate and, b.) trims its balance sheet (i.e. quantitative tightening "QT"). There is no scenario in which the Fed executes QT only to have Treasury yields move lower. It is simply a question of supply and demand. … Continue reading Treasury Yields Will Only Move In One Direction